Wine
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WINE IN COOKING

Wine in cooking. How to use it when cooking and what to avoid. Several tips and “patents”. There are many wine recipes. Virtually it is added to all types of dishes. In fact, you start reading the recipe and you often come across “pour in a glass or two” or “add wine to taste.” What, how much, how, and when?

It is common to marinate meat, poultry, or fish in a wine before cooking. It is added as an ingredient during preparation. And often the chefs add wine at the last moment before serving.

It is used to prepare sauces, use it when passing general food, and even replace with wine, especially white dessert, some of the fats and oils in the production of creams and cakes.

What should you pay attention to when preparing dishes, what should you do and what should you not do in any case?

Here is what some host of the culinary blog, advises.

  • If you are using it for cooking, it must be a good wine. Not necessarily the most expensive, but one that you would be happy to drink just like that.
  • For cooking meat or poultry, it is better to use red, which, in addition to a deep fruity taste, will give the dish and sauce a rich burgundy hue.
  • Fish and seafood are best cooked with white. White goes especially well with sauces based on butter and olive oil.
  • If you are grilling fish or in the oven without sauce, you can simply mix oil with white and brush the whole fish with this mixture.
  • Vegetables and root vegetables feel at ease with both red and white. But green vegetables such as green onions, leeks, zucchini, and others can get a bitter taste in red, so they should be added at the end of the cooking process.
  • A high percentage of acidity is not suitable for prolonged heat treatment. This will give the dish an unpleasant sour taste.
  • But it can be used instead of lemon juice, in small quantities and only at the end of the cooking process.
  • Sweet wines are suitable for both desserts and main courses. But be careful, they contain a lot of sugar, which can very quickly turn into caramel and give the dish a bitter taste.

A following tips from us

1. DO NOT USE SPOILED WINE

Only use wine that is drinkable for cooking. Do not use sour, spoiled or, God forbid, defective. It should be drinkable and fresh. Not suffocated, not cooked.

If it has remained with you over the evening and has even stood for a couple of days, it will still do. But if it has stood in your closet for six months, feel free to pour it into the sink, do not use it.

2.ON THE OTHER HAND …

… that doesn’t mean you have to cook with the same wine you prefer to drink. 

Help for those who live outside Israel – I mean the Jewish tradition of sending gifts – sets of sweets and maybe a bottle of wine.

3. WE ADVISE YOU TO AVOID

Let’s face it, don’t use special “culinary” or “kitchen”. As a rule, these are wines of especially low quality and not proportionally high in price. And it turns out that you will lose in quality, and you will not be able to save money.

4. OBSERVE THE MEASURE

As some said above, you shouldn’t cook with expensive either. In everything, one must observe the measure. Let’s put it this way: use a medium budget for you.

But now, if you need to add only a small amount, and you have only the expensive ones open, then it makes sense to use it. Because otherwise, I would have to open a new bottle. In this case, it will be more economical to pour half a glass from an already open one.

5. PATENT NUMBER ONE

If you are cooking over low heat, use a cheaper and simpler. For example, if you cook or simmer a stew for several hours.

In general, once one chef suggested to us such a patent: use simpler and cheaper but add some good wine at the very end. The result will be as if you cooked everything on it.

6. NO MISS

White, crispy dry wines, non-tart reds are versatile wines. They are almost always suitable for cooking.

Conversely, aromatic wines are very flexible. Therefore, they are not suitable everywhere. Although for the preparation of fatty creamy sauces, they are incomparable. In general, don’t be afraid to experiment. In the worst case, it won’t work once. It will turn out in the next one.

7. FORTIFIED

fortified wines are great for cooking. A small amount adds strength, depth, and often a pleasant sweetness.

But don’t forget about the possible caramelization. If you overdo it with temperature, you can get tones of burnt sugar, and in this case, it will be more likely a defect.

8. WHEN BOILING

Boiling, of course, destroys the wine. But at the same time, its acidity, astringency, and sweetness are transferred to the dish. Moreover, it is the boiling that transfers the concentrated aroma of the wine to the food.

9. ACIDITY AND MEAT

Soaking meat in acidic wine for at least a couple of hours will make it softer and more playful. If you plan to cook it a little, in the sense of the rare style, and not well-done, then you should not soak for too long.

10. PATENT NUMBER TWO – GET YOUR SLEIGH READY IN THE SUMMER

If you have a little left after the feast, pour it into an ice mold and put it in the freezer. This will preserve the ice cubes for cooking. Which will always be at hand.

11. COMBINATIONS

Often a different ingredient can be used in combination with wine. This can be chicken or meat broth, cream, or tomato paste. They balance the wine.

12. ALCOHOL

Finally, a question that we are often asked. If you cook with wine, is there alcohol in the dish? If you kept the dish on fire for two to three hours, then obviously you don’t have to worry about alcohol in it. If you added a little at the very end of the process, then it may well be that some alcohol will remain in the dish. Keep this in mind if you are cooking for children or for people who avoid drinking.

We appeal to you, readers. And for those who prepare food professionally, and for those who have it as a hobby or even a household duty. Send us your recipes, patents, tips and life hacks. Anything related to wine in cooking. And we will gladly publish it.